14734986-a-businessman-burdened-by-heavy-taxes

Ok, you’re a personal trainer, and it’s tax time.  Does your tax bill hit you like a ton of bricks?  Chances are you’ve experienced this pain.  But, there are ways you can plan so that your not working for “Uncle Sam” and paying too much of your heard earned money!

The first thing to consider is how you’re getting taxed–as an employee or contractor?  If you just filed taxes, then this is easy to find out.  If you received a 1099, then you are a contractor.  if you received a W-2, then you are an employee.

What’s The Difference?

If you are a contractor getting a 1099, you are technically self employed.  Meaning, that you will owe self employment tax on whatever your net income is.  This also changes how you file your tax return by requiring you to report your income, and any expenses associated with that income, on a business form called Schedule C.

Getting a W-2 is inherently easier.  You report the W-2 as wages, and there is no self employment tax.

 Which One Is Better?

There is a good, and a bad list to each one.  If you’re detailed, you can save a lot of tax by being self employed.  However, it’s much less complicated to receive a W-2 and report the wages.  Whatever you’re preference is, there are ways to make sure you’re minimizing your tax.

If you need help or have questions, feel free to reach out or leave a comment!  If you have friends that would find this useful, tweet, share, plus this over to them!

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If you have income that is not subject to withholding you may need to pay estimated taxes to the IRS during the year. Whether you need to pay estimated taxes is dependent upon your financial circumstances, what you do for a living (if you’re self-employed for example), and the types of income you receive. Here are six tips that explain estimated taxes and how to pay them.

1. If you have income from sources such as self-employment, interest, dividends, alimony, rent, gains from the sales of assets, prizes or awards, then you may have to pay estimated tax.

2. As a general rule, you must pay estimated taxes in 2013 if both of these statements apply:

1) You expect to owe at least $1,000 in tax after subtracting your tax withholding (if you have any) and tax credits, and

2) You expect your withholding and credits to be less than the smaller of 90 percent of your 2013 taxes or 100 percent of the tax on your 2012 return. Special rules apply for farmers, fishermen, certain household employers and certain higher income taxpayers.

3. Sole Proprietors, Partners, and S Corporation shareholders generally have to make estimated tax payments if they expect to owe $1,000 or more in taxes when they file a return.

4. To figure estimated tax, include expected gross income, taxable income, taxes, deductions and credits for the year. You’ll want to be as accurate as possible to avoid penalties and don’t forget to consider changes in your situation and recent tax law changes.

5. For estimated tax purposes the year is divided into four payment periods or due dates. These dates are generally April 15, June 15, Sept. 15 and Jan. 15 of the next or following year.

6. The easiest way to pay estimated taxes is electronically through the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System, or EFTPS, but you can also figure your tax using Form 1040-ES, Estimated Tax for Individuals and pay any estimated taxes by check or money order using the Estimated Tax Payment Voucher, or by credit or debit card.

Give us a call today if you need help making estimated payments.

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If you employ someone to work for you around your house, it is important to consider the tax implications of this arrangement. While many people disregard the need to pay taxes on household employees, they do so at the risk of paying stiff tax penalties down the road.

As you will see, the rules for hiring household help are quite complex, even for a relatively minor employee, and a mistake can bring on a tax headache that most of us would prefer to avoid.

Who Is a Household Employee?

Commonly referred to as the “nanny tax”, these rules apply to you only if (1) you pay someone for household work and (2) that worker is your employee.

  1. Household work is work that is performed in or around your home by baby-sitters, nannies, health aides, private nurses, maids, caretakers, yard workers, and similar domestic workers.
  2. A household worker is your employee if you control not only what work is done, but how it is done.

    If the worker is your employee, it does not matter whether the work is full-time or part-time, or that you hired the worker through an agency or from a list provided by an agency or association. It also does not matter whether you pay the worker on an hourly, daily, or weekly basis, or by the job.

    If the worker controls how the work is done, the worker is not your employee, but is self-employed. A self-employed worker usually provides his or her own tools and offers services to the general public in an independent business.

    Also, if an agency provides the worker and controls what work is done and how it is done, the worker is not your employee.

Example: You pay Betty to baby-sit your child and do light housework four days a week in your home. Betty follows your specific instructions about household and child care duties. You provide the household equipment and supplies that Betty needs to do her work. Betty is your household employee.

Example: You pay John to care for your lawn. John also offers lawn care services to other homeowners in your neighborhood. He provides his own tools and supplies, and he hires and pays any helpers he needs. Neither John nor his helpers are your household employees.

Can Your Employee Legally Work in the United States?

It is unlawful for you to knowingly hire or continue to employ a person who cannot legally work in the United States.

When you hire a household employee to work for you on a regular basis, he or she must complete USCIS Form I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification. It is your responsibility to verify that the employee is either a U.S. citizen or an alien who can legally work and then complete the employer part of the form. Keep the completed form for your records. Do not return the form to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

Tip: Two copies of Form I-9 are contained in the UCIS Employer Handbook. Visit the USCIS website or call 800-767-1833 to order the handbook, additional copies of the form, or to get more information, or give us a call.

Do You Need to Pay Employment Taxes?

If you have a household employee, you may need to withhold and pay Social Security and Medicare taxes, or you may need to pay federal unemployment tax, or both. Refer to this table for details:

If you…

Then you need to…

Will pay cash wages of $1,800 or more in 2013 to any one household employee.Do not count wages you pay to:

  • your spouse,
  • your child under age 21,
  • your parent, or
  • any employee under age 18 during 2012.
Withhold and pay Social Security and Medicare taxes.

  • The combined taxes are generally 15.3% of cash wages.
  • Your employee’s share is 7.65%.

(You can choose to pay the employee’s share yourself and not withhold it.)

  • Your share is 7.65%.
Have paid or will pay total cash wages of $1,000 or more in any calendar quarter of 2012 or 2013 to household employees.Do not count wages you pay to:

  • your spouse,
  • your child under age 21, or
  • your parent.
Pay federal unemployment tax.

  • The tax is 0.6% of cash wages.
  • Wages over $7,000 a year per employee are not taxed.
  • You also may owe state unemployment tax.

If neither of these two contingencies applies, you do not need to pay any federal unemployment taxes. But you may still need to pay state unemployment taxes. (See below for more on this.)

You do not need to withhold federal income tax from your household employee’s wages. But if your employee asks you to withhold it, you can choose to do so.

Tip: If your household employee cares for your dependent who is under age 13 or your spouse or dependent who is not capable of self care, so that you can work, you may be able to take an income tax credit of up to 35% (or $1,050) of your expenses for each qualifying dependent. If you can take the credit, then you can include your share of the federal and state employment taxes you pay, as well as the employee’s wages, in your qualifying expenses.

State Unemployment Taxes

You should contact your state unemployment tax agency to find out whether you need to pay state unemployment tax for your household employee. You should also find out whether you need to pay or collect other state employment taxes or carry workers’ compensation insurance.

Note: If you do not need to pay Social Security, Medicare, or federal unemployment tax and do not choose to withhold federal income tax, the rest of this article does not apply to you.

Social Security and Medicare Taxes

Social Security taxes pays for old-age, survivor, and disability benefits for workers and their families. The Medicare tax pays for hospital insurance.

Both you and your household employee may owe Social Security and Medicare taxes. Your share is 7.65% (6.2% for Social Security tax and 1.45% for Medicare tax) of the employee’s Social Security and Medicare wages. Your employee’s share is 6.2% for Social Security tax and 1.45% for Medicare tax.

You are responsible for payment of your employee’s share of the taxes as well as your own. You can either withhold your employee’s share from the employee’s wages or pay it from your own funds. Note the limits in the table above.

Wages Not Counted

Do not count wages you pay to any of the following individuals as Social Security and Medicare wages:

    1. Your spouse.

 

    1. Your child who is under age 21.

 

    1. Your parent.

 

Note: However, you should count wages to your parent if both of the following apply: (a) your child lives with you and is either under age 18 or has a physical or mental condition that requires the personal care of an adult for at least 4 continuous weeks in a calendar quarter, and (b) you are divorced and have not remarried, or you are a widow or widower, or you are married to and living with a person whose physical or mental condition prevents him or her from caring for your child for at least 4 continuous weeks in a calendar quarter.

    1. An employee who is under age 18 at any time during the year.

 

Note: However, you should count these wages to an employee under 18 if providing household services is the employee’s principal occupation. If the employee is a student, providing household services is not considered to be his or her principal occupation.

Also, if your employee’s Social Security and Medicare wages reach $113,700 in 2013 ($110,000 in 2012), then do not count any wages you pay that employee during the rest of the year as Social Security wages to figure Social Security tax. You should however, continue to count the employee’s cash wages as Medicare wages to figure Medicare tax. You figure federal income tax withholding on both cash and non-cash wages (based on their value), but do not count as wages any of the following items:

    • Meals provided at your home for your convenience.

 

    • Lodging provided at your home for your convenience and as a condition of employment.

 

    • Up to $240 a month in 2013 for transit passes that you give your employee or, in some cases, for cash reimbursement you make for the amount your employee pays to commute to your home by public transit. A transit pass includes any pass, token, fare card, voucher, or similar item entitling a person to ride on mass transit, such as a bus or train.

 

    • Up to $240 a month in 2013 to reimburse your employee for the cost of parking at or near your home or at or near a location from which your employee commutes to your home.

 

As you can see, tax considerations for household employees are complex. Therefore, we highly recommend professional tax guidance in these complicated matters. This is definitely an area where it’s better to be safe than sorry, so if you have any questions at all, please contact us. We’re happy to assist you.

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April 15 is the annual deadline for most people to file their federal income tax return and pay any taxes they owe. If, for whatever reason, you missed the deadline you may be assessed penalties for both failing to file a tax return and for failing to pay taxes they owe by the deadline. Here are eight important facts every taxpayer should know about penalties for filing or paying late:

1. A failure-to-file penalty may apply if you did not file by the tax filing deadline. A failure-to-pay penalty may apply if you did not pay all of the taxes you owe by the tax filing deadline.

2. The failure-to-file penalty is generally more than the failure-to-pay penalty. You should file your tax return on time each year, even if you’re not able to pay all the taxes you owe by the due date. You can reduce additional interest and penalties by paying as much as you can with your tax return. You should explore other payment options such as getting a loan or making an installment agreement to make payments. Contact us if you need help figuring out how to pay what you owe.

3. The penalty for filing late is normally 5 percent of the unpaid taxes for each month or part of a month that a tax return is late. That penalty starts accruing the day after the tax filing due date and will not exceed 25 percent of your unpaid taxes.

4. If you do not pay your taxes by the tax deadline, you normally will face a failure-to-pay penalty of 1/2 of 1 percent of your unpaid taxes. That penalty applies for each month or part of a month after the due date and starts accruing the day after the tax-filing due date.

5. If you timely requested an extension of time to file your individual income tax return and paid at least 90 percent of the taxes you owe with your request, you may not face a failure-to-pay penalty. However, you must pay any remaining balance by the extended due date.

6. If both the 5 percent failure-to-file penalty and the 1/2 percent failure-to-pay penalties apply in any month, the maximum penalty that you’ll pay for both is 5 percent.

7. If you file your return more than 60 days after the due date or extended due date, the minimum penalty is the smaller of $135 or 100 percent of the unpaid tax.

8. You will not have to pay a late-filing or late-payment penalty if you can show reasonable cause for not filing or paying on time. Give us a call if you have any questions about what constitutes reasonable cause.

Special penalty relief may apply to taxpayers who requested an extension of time to file their 2012 federal income tax returns and some victims of the recent severe storms in parts of the South and Midwest.

In addition, taxpayers affected by the Boston explosions tragedy also qualify for individual tax filing and payment extensions. If you need assistance, please don’t hesitate to call us. We are here to help you.

 

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