How to Choose payroll service blog post

Whenever I mention payroll to business owners I see the telltale signs of them “checking out” mentally, and it’s not surprising!  With terms like FICA, Workers Comp, Unemployment and ObamaCare, it’s no wonder small businesses are confused and sometimes just downright disgusted by it.  In fact, we often tell clients that if they get one thing right in running their business, make sure you hire a competent payroll service!

We want to help you understand how to make the right choice in choosing a payroll service.  So let’s get into it!

Taxes

Penalties on payroll tax errors are some of the most stringent that the IRS will shell out.  So you need to get this right!  Payroll companies will work payroll taxes in one of two ways: impounding and you paying the taxes yourself.

Impounding means that the payroll company takes the taxes from your account, holds on to them, and then pays them on time to the IRS and state agencies.  Sure, they make money on holding onto your funds, but they also take full responsibility for making the payments on time.

Some providers make it pretty easy to pay the taxes yourself via ACH and electronic payments.  However, it’s up to you to press “Submit” and make them on time.

The Verdict:

Use payroll services that impound.  It’s easier to manage cash flow because the taxes are taken out right when you run payroll and the payroll company assumes the responsibility to make the payments on time.

Direct Deposit and Checks

This may seem like a pretty basic thing but did you know that you can save yourself some time and costs by ONLY offering direct deposit?  Direct Deposit is a great way to pay your employees because they get paid right into the accounts.  Checks can be used, but they also create a headache when it comes time to reconcile your bank account.  Payroll companies also charge to push that paper around.  Have employees that don’t have a bank account?  Give them a “Pay Card’ that has it’s own routing and account number and you can “load” it with their pay each pay period.

The Verdict:

Use a payroll service that focuses on direct deposit and you will most likely save money on monthly service fees, postage and mailing, and time when reconciling your bank account.

Integration with Other Apps

Do you use accounting or online scheduling software like Xero or Deputy?  Use a service that ingrates with them to eliminate data entry and make running payroll, easy.  If using online scheduling, within a few clicks you can approve timesheets and send them straight to payroll.  This alone can save you hours each pay period.

The Verdict:

Search out payroll services that are open that integrate with other apps that you use.  Who knows, you may even discover an app you can use for your business this way!

Advanced HR Features

Some businesses have 1-5 employees, some have 50.  And depending on how many you have, will determine how much help you’ll need managing them.

If you have a large staff to manage, payroll companies like ADP have robust services beyond just running payroll that offers on-site HR reps that can come out “do your dirty work” for you, a.k.a.hire and fire.  They can also help you navigate the tricky waters of the ACA (ObamaCare) and provide employee handbooks, amongst other things.

If only a few employees, then a company like Gusto is often a good choice.  While they don’t provide robust HR services, they can offer very competitive rates on Workers Comp insurance, and make managing your employees pretty easy.

The Verdict:

Make a choice based on your payroll needs and employee size.

Pricing and Cost

This is what it boils down to right?  There are two methods that payroll services use to charge their fees: a flat fee per month, or fee per pay period.

Flat fee per month gives you a predictable cost each month.  Generally, there is a base cost and then a per-employee-per-month cost.  So as long as you know how many employees you’re paying, your fee is pretty predictable.  And, these companies don’t charge for anything extra like W-2’s and quarterly reports, as long as you are a subscriber.

Per-pay-period providers charge each time your run a payroll.  For most businesses, this is twice per month.  They will also charge additional fees for W-2’s and quarterly reports.  There are also other charges for mailing checks, etc., so make sure you have the payroll service spell our EVERY thing that is going to cost before you sign up.

The Verdict:

Use a service provider that charges a flat fee per month.  There is less confusion on fees and it’s generally cheaper each month.

Make it Happen!

As you can see, there’re lots to consider when choosing the right payroll service provider for you.  We can help you make that choice and get you in touch with the people to make things happen.   Have questions, leave a comment or reach out to us on our Get In Touch page and we’ll be happy to help you make the best decision for you and your business.

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Whether you’re budgeting for your business, organization, or a department you’re in charge of, it can be a daunting task!  But believe it or not, the nuts of bolts of how to create, manage, and execute a budget is the easy part.  Most often, the challenge is to train ourselves how to treat the funds we have stewardship over.

Traditional Budgeting, Right or Wrong?

If you’ve ever worked for large corporations, institutions, or organizations, the attitude is usually “use what’s been allotted to you, or lose it!”  That attitude is reactive in nature because you base the budget off of what happened in the past.  So, you may ask, what’s wrong with that?  The short answer maybe nothing at all.  But if you work for a cash sensitive business where funds are closely monitored, either due to cash flow, or the nature of the funds is more custodial in nature (tithes in churches), this is generally the wrong approach to budgeting.  Chances are if you’re reading this, that you fall under that categorization.

The Proactive Approach

Zero-based Budgeting (ZBB) is a term that has become popular in recent years, and is truly the proactive approach to budgeting.  Instead of basing budget amounts and expenditures on what happened in the past, it requires those who are designing the budget to ask “what do we need for this year or program?”.  So instead of using last year’s performance, you effectively wipe the slate clean and ONLY plan for what your expectations are coming up.

For example, let’s say you are budgeting for your kids extra-curricular activities for the upcoming year.  Last year your kids played soccer, with a total cost of $300 for the year.  This year, you decide your kids don’t have what it takes to be the star player, so you put them in Karate, for a total annual cost of $1200.  Now, let’s budget!

Under the traditional method, you would use history to create your new budget so we have $300 in the budget.  I bet you can already see the problem!  Now, because you used a traditional budget, before you make it half of the year, you are already over budget.

Under the ZBB method, you think ahead: “I know my kids played soccer for $300, but I know they want to try karate and that’s going to cost $1200″.  So you budget for $1200.  Viola! You just created a budget and it looks like you’re going to stick to it!

Conclusion

You can see the difference in the budgeting methods used in the example above.  It’s up to you to think about your budget from a “Zero-based” point of reference so that you can use your funds proactively.  It may be hard, and take some cognitive training, but in the end, it will be worth it when your are using hard-earned funds, to their maximum potential to achieve your goals.

If you have questions, please comment below, or “Contact Us” and we’ll be happy to help!

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